Tag Archive | Things to see

36 of 365 pix – Clonbeg Church, Glen of Aherlow

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I had some job keeping the rain off my lens for these photos, and the wind was something else. As I entered the church grounds clutching my camera to me, a man hurrying towards his car gave me a look that implied that I was completely bonkers.

He was probably right.  And not just because of the photos.

Clonbeg Church, Glen of Aherlow

Cloonbeg4

Clonbeg Church was built in the 1800s  and is Church of Ireland. The graveyard is both Catholic and Church of Ireland.  Within the church grounds, the remains of an old medieval church can be seen and are covered almost entirely in ivy.

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35 of 365 pix – Moore Abbey, Glen of Aherlow

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My 365 pix have fallen a little by the wayside recently. I’m determined to find 365 great places to visit in Tipperary (especially free places), and blog about them. I’ll be pulling back on daily posts though and taking photos just three or four days a week, or whenever I get time, so it won’t be a 365 pix in the generally accepted sense.

‘Stuff’ happens. 

Anyway, onto photo number 35!

Moore Abbey, Glen of Aherlow

Moore Abbey Glen of Aherlow

Moore Abbey is a bit of an unfortunate place. It was founded in 1204 by the King of Thomond, Donough Gairbreach O’Brien as a Franciscan abbey and, apparently, it took 300 years to build (Ref:  Aherlow Website). It was burned four times during the course of building, by the armies of Desmond and Ormond. It was burned to the ground in 1472 and rebuilt in 1473. Continue reading

33 of 365 – Grangefertagh Church and Round Tower

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Because I had to drive to Abbeyleix the other day, I included this on my travels.  I know it’s in Kilkenny, but it’s not a million miles away from Urlingford really….well, not really…is it?

Grangefertagh Church and Round Tower

Grangefertagh Round Tower

I thought at first that the tower was in someone’s farmyard, but there’s a very narrow road up to the side of it with just enough space outside the tower to park a very very small car in.

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31 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Mullough Abbey

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There’s nothing like a cold blast of air and two icy feet to start the morning off.  With an hour to kill before I dropped my daughter to school and started a day of “Mum’s taxi-runs”, I ventured out to Newcastle to look for Mullough Abbey.

Coming from Clonmel you can’t miss the signposted pillar beside the new graveyard….unless you’re me….so I drove by it and into Newcastle before I realised the error of my ways.

Mullough Abbey, Newcastle

Mullough Abbey

The abbey is in a lovely spot, but it’s an awful pity about the perimeter wall.  I wonder is there any chance that there’s a plan to cover it with natural stone, or even grow a hedge to cover it.

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30 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Lady’s Abbey, Ardfinnan

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Lady’s Abbey, Ardfinnan

Lady's Abbey, Ardfinnan

 

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29 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Ballybacon Medieval Church

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Ballybacon medieval church

Ballybacon Church Continue reading

28 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Loughmore/Loughmoe Church

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Yesterday’s 365 pic – intentionally late – a small mark of respect to a wonderful lady who passed away at the weekend.

I was in Templemore for training, and as I had seen photos of this church on Tom Nelligan’s blog – www.thestandingstone.ie, I thought I’d take a detour through Loughmore to photograph it.

I left Clonmel early yesterday morning, but when I reached Loughmore the skies were still dreadfully dark, thanks to the woeful weather.  Driving onwards to Templemore in the lashing rain, I could see (or rather I couldn’t see) the Devil’s Bit obscured with thick, heavy cloud. Not a photo opportunity in sight.

So it wasn’t until late that afternoon that I managed to get back to Loughmore, and I got a five minute break in the rain when I could take a few photos. A strong wind threatened to blow the camera out of my hands and it was all I could do to keep the lens steady. ( I won’t draw your attention to the blurry bits in the photos). Makes mental note:- next time BRING  A TRIPOD!!!

Loughmore Church

Loughmore Church

The graveyard is fascinating.  It’s been maintained really well, and I spent several minutes looking at the headstones. (I could easily have spent an hour if I hadn’t been getting soaked wet by the driving rain.)  One of the plots was over two hundred years old and the inscription on the headstone could be read as easily if it had been engraved yesterday.

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27 of 365 pix – Places to see in Tipperary – Dove Hill Castle, Carrick-on-Suir

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Some of you will have seen my Tweets and my Facebook status last night and early this morning, and will know that I spent some time in A&E last night.  Several people thought I was there with John because of the photos I posted of him last night with the angle grinder.  😀 John is fine.  It was Ally who wasn’t feeling well and she was kept in last night, unfortunately.

I finally got home at about 2AM this morning so I had a late start today – probably just as well as the sun came out and I had a window of photographic opportunity for a while.

Dove Hill Castle, Carrick-on-Suir

Dove Hill Castle

I must have passed this tower house hundreds of times on the road from Clonmel to Waterford and have never stopped to take a look. So, seeing as Ally could leave the hospital for a while today, I took both her and Bláthnaid for a spin.

Dove Hill Castle is a Norman tower built about 1450, and is very much in ruins. The ivy has taken a firm hold on the building as you can see from the photos.

Dove Hill Castle

The tower is sited on private land.  There is a gate, with a section removed, that allows one to climb through easily into the field, and there’s a pathway worn through the hay up to the castle. Further down another gate states that trespassers will be prosecuted. I didn’t see that gate until I came out though, and I think maybe it leads into a different field (…honest, Garda).

If you feel you’d rather not take your chances with the sign, then you can easily take a photo of the tower from the gate. Just don’t arrive on a sunny day at lunchtime or it’ll be a silhouette you’ll be photographing.

Dove Hill Irish Design Centre

When you’re all towered out you can nip across to the Dove Hill Irish Design Centre and shop to your heart’s content. I don’t want to sound like an advertisement, but they’ve a fantastic Newbridge Silverware section, they stock gorgeous Meadows & Byrne kitchen and homeware, and Lily Mai’s café is great for lunch and dinner.

It’s an awful pity Dove Hill wouldn’t do something with their website though.

I took a spin out to Mahon Falls where the sun decided to do a disappearing act, and I almost froze to death trying to take a photo. It was 5 degrees up there and people were strolling around the mountain looking freshfaced, windblown and happy.

Mahon Falls

I can’t remember the last time I was up at Mahon Falls, and the landscape is really stunning. There are lots of places where you can pull in to admire the view, and there are at least two carparks where you can park up for a while if you fancy a bit of hillwalking.

Mahon Falls

Did I mention the magic road? A little way down from the waterfall is an incline beside a Fairy Bush (or a raggy bush as it’s sometimes called). If you turn your engine off and put your car into neutral, your car will magically roll UP the hill! Try it, but try it on a day that’s not Sunday in order to avoid the steady stream of cars touring the Comeraghs.

26 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Lough Doire Bhile

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Today’s 365 Tipperary pic wasn’t actually taken today, just in case you were wondering where the lovely calm evening came from.  Being without a car, I had to search through my archive of photos and came across this one. (My actual 365 pic for today is something entirely different, but I’ll post that in a minute.)

Lough Doire Bhile

Lough Doire Bhile

Situated not far from Glengoole, just off the bog road to Littleton, Lough Doire Bhile is a beautiful oasis of peace and calm. Ally and I went out one evening for a walk and spent about an hour taking photos, mostly of each other. We met lots of people out walking, and there were a couple of fishermen sitting on their little stools with their fishing lines dangling in the water. If I didn’t take photos I think I’d fish instead.  It would be a great excuse to sit daydreaming for the day.

The lake, which is on the site of an old, exhausted bog, is apparently stocked full of brown trout, although I’ve heard it can be a bit ‘hit and miss’ as to whether you’d catch anything (explains the ‘dangling’).  Still, even if you don’t catch the tea, you can always bring a few sandwiches with you and have them at one of the picnic benches beside the lake. Bliss!

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The photos I actually took today (to fulfill the 365 aspect) are below – more night time shots. John was out back earlier cutting a piece of metal to shape and I couldn’t resist grabbing the camera and trying to capture the patterns of the sparks flying.

I hope my car is fixed soon or there could be sparks of a different sort flying.

angleGrinder Angle Grinder

25 of 365 pix – Places to visit in Tipperary – Kilcooley Abbey

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I’m very glad I started this 365 project.  Over the last couple of weeks I’ve gotten to see parts of the country that I don’t think I’d ever have seen only for starting it.  (I knew there was a reason I wanted to be an auctioneer all those years ago – all that driving around, looking at the countryside.)

I drove to Gortnahoe (Gurt na who?) today.  Now, I’ve been through Gortnahoe before and have never given it a second thought, but I think I would have paid more attention if I’d known this magnificent abbey was just a little further out the road.

Kilcooley Abbey

Kilcooley Abbey

The SatNav brought me straight to the location…almost. SatNav Sally (as I’ve come to call her) announced that I’d arrived at my destination alongside a very high stone wall that seemed to run for miles with not an abbey in site.

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